High School English Courses

High School English 1
Suggested Age

13-15 years, approximately ninth or tenth grade

Prerequisite

Middle School English 2, or consent of the instructor based on student writing sample.

Purpose

High School English 1 introduces students to a variety of writing types and purposes, as well as literary analysis elements and techniques. These include narrative, descriptive, and persuasive writing, literary analysis, basic essay writing, and research and presentation skills.

 

Process

High School English 1 is an introductory writing and composition course for the high school years. Students review basic grammar, punctuation, and sentence combining through a daily grammar practice exercise. Students are also introduced to sentence variety and complexity through a focused study of clauses and phrases. Students will build on previous study in plot, characterization, and figurative language and study point of view and literary techniques such as satire and irony. Writing instruction includes scaffolded instruction in structured essay writing. Finally, students will learn the basics of research paper writing, culminating in a short research paper and presentation.

Parental Responsibilities

Parents are responsible for helping their student establish a weekly routine that includes daily grammar and sentence writing practice and feedback as well as time to work on required homework and study for class each day. Parents are responsible to implement daily instruction from the Easy Grammar Ultimate Series (grade 9), check student work and offer feedback. Students will benefit most from this daily practice, as well as time each day for writing, reflection, revision, and/or vocabulary study. It is highly recommended that parents review student writing and offer feedback before final drafts are turned in.

Curriculum/Materials
High School English 2
Suggested Age

16-18 years, approximately 11th or 12th grade

Prerequisites

High School English 1, or consent of the instructor based on student writing sample. It is also recommended that students have also completed American Literature.

Purpose

High School English 2 builds on previous writing and literature studies to introduce upper high school students to rhetorical analysis, and critical thinking and evaluation skills, as well as the research and writing skills needed to succeed in the workplace or in university studies.

 

Process

High School English 2 is an advanced composition course that builds on previous grammar and vocabulary study, as well as previous writing and literature courses to extend and expand student skills in understanding, analysis and communication.  The course includes continued study in essay writing, including the college essay or personal narrative, timed essays, and persuasive essays. Students are introduced to rhetorical analysis, how to construct an effective argument, and the persuasive research paper and recorded presentation. Students will also develop critical thinking skills as they evaluate and compare a wide variety of historical documents, speeches, essays, and stories. 

Parental Responsibilities

Parents are responsible for helping their student establish a weekly routine that includes daily grammar and sentence writing practice and feedback as well as time to work on required homework and study for class each day. Parents are also responsible to implement daily instruction from the Easy Grammar Ultimate Series (grade 11), check student work and offer feedback. Students will benefit most from this daily practice in grammar and sentence practice, as well as time each day for writing, reflection, revision, and/or vocabulary study. It is highly recommended that parents review student writing and offer feedback before final drafts are turned in.

Curriculum/Materials
British & Classical Literature
Suggested Age

16-18 years

 

Prerequisite

A successful completion of High School English 2 or equivalent or One Day Academy’s American Literature  course—or upon approval of the instructor based on a writing sample  

 

Purpose

To aid the student in thoughtful analysis of various classical and British works of ancient origin through the   20th century.   

 

Process

Students will learn how the Bible’s authors, Homer, and British authors utilized characterization, setting, irony,  and other literary tools to expand upon various themes in ways unique to the local culture at the time of the  work’s conception, yet still relevant today. Through this course, students learn to discuss at a college level major  artistic works in the context of their impact on society and on individuals while becoming more confident in  expressing their interpretations based on a Christian worldview. Lessons include:  

  • An overview of the history of the time period and its predominant worldviews,  

  • An explanation of the authors, their backgrounds, and personal worldviews,  

  • Themes of the works and their biblical relevance,  

  • Charts, essay questions, and literary analysis essays.  

Parental Responsibilities  

Parents are responsible for purchasing the course workbook and each of the reading titles (print version  preferred) for their student at the beginning of the year. While library editions are also permitted, students must  have the workbook and the current reading book with them in class each week. At this level, students are  encouraged to pace out their reading, fill in the worksheets, and submit their writing and worksheet  assignments independently and on time. 

 

Curriculum/Materials
Journalism
Suggested Age

13 and up

 

Prerequisites

Students should have some previous writing instruction and be able to work independently.

Purpose/Process

The focus of this class will be on journalistic writing, but students also will be instructed on the various branches of the news media and the general communications field. This will include:

 

  • Reporting

  • Interviewing

  • Article writing (online or print news)

  • History of journalism and Christian ethics in journalism

  • Analyzing and tracking current news topics

  • Editing and proofing

  • Copy writing (television, radio)

  • Photography as it relates to journalism with emphasis on content and what constitutes good visual coverage of a story

  • Editorial management

  • Opinion and editorial writing

  • Introduction to publication design

  • Overview of the communications field, including broadcast journalism, social media, public relations, etc.

 

Students will write for ODA Insight, One Day Academy’s online blog. Reporting, writing, and photography are assigned as homework, with weekly progress and drafts graded for effort, writing quality, and timeliness. This class is considered an introduction to publishing and other media, so students will learn the importance of meeting deadlines and how to produce an article from start to finish in a timely manner.

Curriculum
American Literature
Suggested Age

15‐18

Prerequisite

Completion of H.S. English 1 or upon approval of the instructor based on a writing sample.  

Purpose

The course’s first semester focuses on the culture of the United States surrounding the Civil  War while the second semester highlights the consequences of our country’s progressive social  evolution away from being predominantly Christian.   

Process

Students will learn how classic American authors utilized characterization, setting, irony, and other literary tools to expand upon various themes, often in ways that are unique to American  culture. Students are encouraged to contemplate the use of these tools and themes and analyze them from a Christian perspective through class discussion and writing assignments.  

 

Lessons and homework include:  

An overview of the history of the time period and its predominant worldviews,  An explanation of the authors, their backgrounds, and personal worldviews,  Charts, essay questions, and literary analysis essays. 

Parental Responsibilities  

Parents are responsible for purchasing the course workbook and each of the reading titles  (print version preferred) for their student at the beginning of the year. While library editions  are also permitted, students must have the workbook and the current reading book with them  in class each week. Parents are also asked to help their student pace out their reading, fill in the  worksheets, and submit their writing and worksheet assignments on time. 

 

Curriculum/Materials

Original, unabridged versions of the following titles:
    •   The Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
    •   Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe
    •   The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain
    •   Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott
    •   My Antonía, by Willa Cather
    •   The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald

     •   To Kill a Mockingbird, by Harper Lee
    •   The Old Man and the Sea, by Ernest Hemingway, preferred edition: Simon and Schuster ISBN: 978-0-684-80122-3

     •   Fahrenheit 451, by Ray Bradbury

     •   The Outsiders, by S.E. Hinton